Agriculture

Specific risks in the agricultural industry

Agricultural facilities pose a wide variety of microbial hazards, including infectious diseases from animals, allergies to animal dander, food stuffs and from mould spores within the inside air.

Any indoor animal facility potentially possesses higher levels of airborne microbes than any other indoor environment. Many animal pathogens are able to be transferred to humans through air and these pathogens can often cause respiratory problems for people who become infected. Studies have shown that some farmers may inhale up to 75,000 spores per minute when working around hay stores.

Our solutions

Natural ventilation is often abundant in agricultural settings, but not always. Within enclosed spaces such as poultry/pig sheds or abattoirs, to ensure infection risk is minimised, you could consider:

Mechanical ventilation fitted with our in-duct Germicidal UV (GUV) devices

HVAC with adequate filters and anti-pathogen controls like GUV will drastically reduce the risk of microbes being transmitted to workers.

Upper room GUV systems

These localised air disinfection systems prevent transmission in areas which pose a higher airborne infection risk or higher risk infection type eg zoonotic diseases or fungal spores.

Surface disinfection

After-hours agricultural sterilisation of livestock sheds, food process and storage facilities will benefit greatly as microbes that live on the food will be removed, which in turn reduces risk to workers.

As professional engineers, scientists and medics, we know intimately how to target the infection risks by designing bespoke solutions, combining established and proven engineering and health technologies, to take your biosecurity and biosafety to a new level.

Our solutions have been proven over decades in high-risk applications against other microbial hazards. Our products have 80 years infection intervention deployment and uniquely, helped reduce coronavirus infections in Singapore and Hong Kong hospitals and other important buildings during the first SARS (Covid) pandemic in 2003.

Industrial agriculture